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20130831
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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 97 (some duplicates have been removed)
is that there were a series of phone call records stored from the washington, d.c. area code-- zip code, forgive me, and this was a glitch, essentially, because a switch missed read 202 for 20, which is the country code for egypt. we are allowed to collect a lot of records about foarp communications, but when you start collecting a lot of washington, d.c. phone records, it's another story. >> warner: now, had these violations been reported to the
, for secret u.s. intelligence efforts. "the washington post" reports that, among other things, the national security agency was investigating up to 4,000 reports of possibly security breaches by its own employees, last year. in economic news, the commerce department announced growth last spring was much better than
warner has the latest on options for action in syria. then we return to the march on washington 50 years on. tonight reflections from the last living speaker, georgia congressman john liu business. >> it was all inclusive it was black and white, latino, asia asian-american and native american. >> they came from idaho, wyoming, and they were there. carrying their signs. >> and we conclude our series on governing in a time of gridlock with a look at how the entertainment world sees the nation's capital. >> the question we ask is if someone is actually getting something done, do the ends justify the means? it is an interesting question to ask when washington is paralyzed by gridlock. >> that is all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by... moving our economy for 160 years, bnsf the engine that connects us. >> and the hewlett foundation working to solve social and environmental problems at home and around the world. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and this program was made possible by the corporation for pub
our march on washington conversation series, as a father and son reflect on what that event has young people were found with courage and some often radical symptoms, i wouldn't have the >> ifill: and we close with the story of army staff sergeant ty michael carter, who received the nation's highest military honor today for his bravery druing the war on afghanistan. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> bnsf railway. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and friends of the newshour. >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: the united states insisted today it is "undeniable" that syria's rulers gassed their own people last week, just outside damascus. that was coupled with new warnings of repercussions yet to opportun
driving the politics and gridlock in washington with two authors and veteran political journalists: robert draper and mark leibovich. >> you do wonder, when people are in office, when people are in power, who are they really working for? are they in it to serve the public good, or are they in it for self-service? >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> suarez: president obama took aim at the soaring cost of college today with an ambitious plan to rate schools and link tuition prices to federal financial aid. >> a higher education is the single best investment y
challenging moments of diplomacy, the u.s. and russia held high-level meetings in washington. margaret warner recaps today's talks. >> brown: four out of ten street lights don't work and it takes an hour on average for detroit police to respond to 9-1-1 calls. hari sreenivasan looks at the motor city's battle amid bankruptcy. >> detroiters are so used to bad news, and they are so used to things not really breaking our way, and they're used to getting up the next morning and going, "well, i can't stop, i've got to keep going, i've got to keep trying." >> woodruff: david brooks and ruth marcus analyze the week's news. >> brown: and yes, those are goats in that graveyard. more than a hundred of them. kwame holman tells us what they're doing in this historic washington, d.c., cemetery. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour h been provided by: >> support also comes from carnegie corporation of new york, a foundation created to do what andrew carnegie called "real and permanent good." celebrating 100 years of philanthropy at carnegie.org. >> an
on washington remains a seminal moment in american history. tonight, we kick off a series of discussions to mark the anniversary. >> we've forgotten most of the >> brown: and remembering a stalwart of american political journalism. we look back at the career of the long-time reporter, columnist and t.v. commentator, jack germond. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> supported by the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation. committed to building a more just, verdant and peaceful world. more information at macfound.org >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. >> brown: the political crisis in egypt reached a new turning point today. security forces made good on a pledge to sweep away sit-ins that sprang up after the military ousted president mohammed morsi in late june. the country's health ministry reported at least 235 civilians and 4
.e.o. of the "washington post's" parent company, donald graham. >> warner: "i am the shooter," declared army major nidal hasan at the start of his trial in an attack that killed 13 at fort hood, texas. we look at today's opening arguments and early testimony. >> ifill: the pentagon eased financial pain for its employees by cutting unpaid furlough from 11 days to six. ray suarez discusses the budget cuts and terror threats with deputy secretary of defense ashton carter. >> our effort to deal with the current budget situation, we believe, has to be driven by strategy. that is, a view of the future. terrorism is one of those things that's going to be around. >> warner: and more than 1.5 million people have fled the bloody syrian civil war. we have an on-the-ground report from the world's second largest refugee camp in jordan. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and the william and flora hewlett foundation, working to solve social and environmental proble
would precipitate another crisis here in washington that no economist thinks is a good idea-- i'm assuming that they will not take that... that path. i have confidence that common sense in the end will prevail. >> woodruff: the president also fielded questions on his upcoming decision to appoint a new federal reserve chairman this fall, saying it was one of the most important decisions that remained in his presidency. and he also urged house republicans to move forward with an immigration reform bill once members return from their summer recess. >> brown: later in the program we'll have david brooks and ruth marcus respond to what the president said. between now and then: the u.s. and russia try to warm their frosty relationship; detroit struggles after declaring bankruptcy; brooks and marcus on the week's news and goats in the graveyard. but first, the other news of the day. here's kwame holman. >> holman: american government personnel left lahore, pakistan today because of a specific threat to the consulate there. the u.s. shifted non-essential staff from lahore to the capita
at the march on washington 50 years on. tonight, reflections from one of its organizers, congresswoman eleanor holmes norton. >> it was startling to see so many people come. and i remember standing at the lincoln memorial, looking out. look, looking out was what was the sight for me, because i could not see the last person. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> suarez: the syrian government pounded rebel areas outside the capital, damascus, early today, and antigovernment activists said some rockets included chemical weapons that killed hundreds of people. .(children shouting/crying) women and children shielded their faces with handkerchiefs. while victims-- writhing in pain-- gasped for air,some foaming at the mouth. these amateur videos-- all posted on social media websites and cannot be i
. >> brown: and we continue our look at the legacy of the march on washington 50 years on. tonight, reflections on the challenges ahead for martin luther king's vision for a multi-racial democracy. >> 40% of whites don't have friends outside of their own race. so in some ways we're still as segregated as we were 50 years ago and i think that king would be very concerned about that. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: the united states worked today to firm up the intelligence behind claims that syria used chemical weapons and to win support fo
extends beyond the border of washington state into british columbia. it's one of the largest and most biologically rich inland seas in the world. jeremiah julius is a fisherman from the lummi tribal community. the whole landscape is sacred to us. there's not much contaminant free lands left in the united states. this is one of them. >> reporter: for hundreds of generations, his tribe has relied on the halibut, salmon and crab that thrive in these waters. >> fishing is who we are. fishing is our culture. and to us, culture is fish. it's just in our blood. >> reporter: but there's a storm brewing at cherry point, just north of bellingham, washington. this is where s.s.a. marine wants to build the largest coal export terminal in north america. nearly 500 ships would travel these waters every year, carrying coal to the other side of the pacific. asia consumes more coal than rest of the world combined. in the next three years, countries there are expected to double the amount of coal they import today. that soaring demand spells opportunity for u.s. companies, according to bob waters, dire
and how it permanently changed politics. we talk to the washington post's dan balz about his book, "collision 2012." >> everything changes from one cycle to another. i don't think i've seen as many changes in one cycle as we saw between 2008 and 2012. >> brown: and can apps for babies be educational? or are they harmful entertainment? we look at one advocacy group's complaint to the federal trade commission. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: a badly damaged nuclear plant in japan loomed over budget talks today in tokyo. officials are working
, following his speech at the lincoln memorial today, 50 years after the march on washington. >> no one can match king's brilliance but the same flame can light the heart of all who are willing to take a first step towards justice. i know that flame remains. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> supported by the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation. committed to building a more just, verdant and peaceful world. more information at macfound.org >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: there was a flurry of activity around the world today on what happens next in syria. at the united nations, britain submitted a resolution to the security council condemning syria for an alleged chemical attack, and authorizing the use of force in response. the u.n. envoy to syria, lakhdar brahimi, warned any military action mu
on washington, 50 years on. tonight, the long journey of the civil rights movement, and its unfinished business. >> we have this, in my view, race-based partisan gridlock that denies the possibilities that america can do what we proved we could do in the 60s, which is tackle our toughest problem. >> brown: and we remember seamus heaney-- the nobel-prize winning poet who died today in his native ireland. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> support also comes from carnegie corporation of new york, a foundation created to do what andrew carnegie called "real and permanent good." celebrating 100 years of philanthropy at carnegie.org. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and friends of the newshour. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: the obama administration today laid out its case, in detail, that the syrian government used chemical weapons on its own
with washington? we kick off a series on governing and leadership. tonight, three historians on partisanship and gridlock in the nation's capital. >> woodruff: and in an age of budget cuts, the u.s. space agency must rein in its orbits of exploration. we take a closer look at nasa's uncertain future. >> nasa for years has had a flat budget. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> and by bnsf railway. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and friends of the newshour. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: the situation in egypt took another volatile turn today with news that former president hosni mubarek might be released from prison. this comes amidst continuing violence, this time with mass shootings on the sinai peninsula. peninsula. a state of emergency remains in pleas
an update on the surveillance programs from carol leonnig of the "washington post." >> brown: the kepler space telescope, once used to search for earth-like planets, is crippled, and nasa says it can't be fixed. we explore its legacy and ask if it can still be used for scientific research. >> woodruff: under a pristine rain forest in ecuador lie more than 800 million barrels of oil. the country's president had asked the world to ante up in exchange for a promise not to drill, but that plan is being scrapped, as hari sreenivasan reports. >> brown: mark shields and david brooks analyze the week's news. >> ♪ just wishing i changed my ways... ♪ >> woodruff: and two men from two generations connected by a love of the blues are now collaborators on tour. we profile charlie musslewhite and ben harper. >> this is what the blues are supposed to do.. make you feel good. it's your comforter when you're down and your buddy when you're up. all purpose music. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> bnsf railway. >> support
and defense secretary chuck hagel will meet with their russian counterparts in washington on friday. >> brown: was the president right to cancel the meeting? and where does this leave u.s.- russian relations? stephen sestanovich teaches international diplomacy at columbia university. he served in the state department during the reagan and clinton administrations. dimitri simes is president of the center for the national interest. he just returned from a trip to russia where he met with senior russian officials. welcome to both of you. stephen sestanovich was it the snowden asylum in the end that led to this and do you think it was the right move. >> i think it was a key factor in the decision but it wasn't the most important issue. what it did was force the administration to take careful stock of where the relationship stood. what's going on they had to ask, and is this meeting going to be a loser. i think they were right to conclude it was going to be a loser. that it was going to be a waste of time, at best, and at worst. >> brown: you told one of our producers earlier today you think pres
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 97 (some duplicates have been removed)